I bought a Star Trek; or, how not to drill a lock

A friend posted a link to a $400 Bally Star Trek on Craigslist. It was clearly bombed out, but I was looking for a restoration candidate. I went for it.

The seller said he didn’t have the head key. This meant two things: first, it was going to take a  big vehicle to move it back to my house. Second, the computer was going to be corroded. But the game was mostly working, how bad could it be?

I a U-Haul van, a little Ford Econoline, at the place near my house, and headed to the seller’s place. I got there around 5 and after some smalltalk, I paid and then started figuring out how to get the game in the van. I have skates so it wasn’t too bad. I got the front legs off and we got the front of the game onto the van; then, the back legs off, and slid the game right into the door latch of the van.

That’s right, an ’80s Bally game won’t fit in an Econoline van with the head on.

Fortunately, I was somewhat prepared for this eventuality and had my drill and a bunch of bits. But I didn’t think carefully about how the backbox works and spent two hours trying to open a door instead of just lifting the glass out.

I finally lifted the glass out in the relative dark and got the game home in three pieces: head, cabinet, and glass, which I won’t put back in until I have a proper lift channel on it.

Anyway, I bought the game in early November and am just starting to shop it. Eventually I’d like to restore it, but this is at the end of a long list of projects.

Williams EMs Sometimes Have Interlock Switches

I decided to spend a few minutes trying to fix my Spanish Eyes.  It just wasn’t getting power at all.

I stared at the schematic for a while and chatted with Chris a bit, and he said, “Is there an interlock switch?”

Yep, sure enough, there is.

Gottlieb and Williams games, particularly those with three-prong power cords, have interlock switches and the coin door must be closed for operation. It is even rarer to find one that has not been bypassed.

And it’s not in my schematic!  I don’t know why.  I might guess that it was a factory option, on some games, but I know of other Spanish Eyes that don’t have the interlock switch. It looks factory, and I can’t imagine anyone ADDING an interlock switch.

(An interlock switch cuts power when the coin door.  Most video games have them on the back panel, and some games, particularly early ’80s Atari games, have them on the coin door.)